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Course Catalog: Summer 2019

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Course Registration now open for all Summer 2019 Pre-College Programs.

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Course Title

Live Like It's 3000 BC: Introduction to Experimental Archaeology

Ancient DNA: Uncovering the Secrets of Our Species

Modeling Living Systems: The Principles of Life

Acid/Base Chemistry: From Food to Everyday Phenomena

Engineering Selfcare - The Science of Cosmetics

Artificial Intelligence: Modeling Human Intelligence with Networks

Crash Course in R Programming

Decoding the Gut Microbiome: An Introduction to Computational Biology

Hiding in Plain Sight: An Introduction to the Art of Cryptography

Introduction to Statistical Programming in R

Introduction to Systems Thinking: Game Design and Learning

Learn to Program in Five Days

An Introduction to Game Theory

Econometrics: Statistical Tools to Understand Economic Data

Introduction to Behavioral Finance

Alternative Energy Engineering: An Introduction

Biomedical Engineering: The Smart Design of Medical Implants and Devices

Engineering Biomedical Systems

Engineering with Arduino: Project-Based Electronics and Programming

Fluid Mechanics Through Hovercraft Physics

Flying Robots: How to Build and Program Small UAV's Using the Robot Operating System

Heart of the Matter: Designing Implantable Devices for the Cardiovascular System

Introduction to Computer Aided Design (CAD) and 3D Printing

Introduction to Engineering and Design

Learning Matlab by Digital Simulation of a 4-Rover Game

Materials Engineering: A Revolution in the Making

Materials Science and Engineering: Designing for Society's Needs

Mechatronic Design for Game-playing Rovers

Renewable Energy Engineering: Wind and Solar Power

Creative Coding: Reading and Writing Web-based Literature Online

Research Methods in Marine Science

Studying the Ocean from the Classroom to the Bay

Tiny Solutions for Big Problems: Introduction to Environmental Nanotechnology

Habitable Worlds: Possible Places for Life in the Solar System and Beyond

Introduction to Modern and Contemporary Architecture

A Closer Look at Infinity with Logic Problems

Applied Linear Algebra

Introduction to Applied Geometry

Introduction to Applied Mathematics: An Interdisciplinary Approach

Logic & Paradox

Mathematical Modeling of Finance: An Introduction to Quantitative Analysis

Number Theory: An Introduction to Higher Mathematics

Probability and Its Applications

Set Theory: The Dazzling Foundation of Abstract Mathematics

Statistics in the Real World

Science, Perception and Reality

The Ethics of Technology: Privacy, Biased Algorithms, and Moral Robots

This discussion-based class surveys a range of ethical (broadly construed) issues arising from emerging technologies. In doing so, the course also aims to sharpen students' skills at critical thinking, analysis, and argumentation. The issues we'll discuss include:

- Privacy

Privacy I: It's common to hear worries about privacy in internet and data ethics. What might such worries be about, in more concrete terms? Are we always talking about the same thing, when we claim to be worried about privacy? And why, most fundamentally, do we care about privacy? Suppose, for instance, that data about us is collected, but in such a way that we aren't identifiable: is our privacy nevertheless still threatened?

Privacy II: Do social media companies (such as Facebook) have a moral obligation to suppress the spread of fake news over their networks? Is the suppression of fake news by social media companies a form of censorship? Is censorship ever morally permissible --- and if so, under what conditions?

- Bias and discrimination

Do emerging technologies like Big Data increase inequality or be unfair, and if so, how? In what way might the algorithms driving decisions behind the scenes be biased or discriminatory? (And what is it to discriminate?)

- Building ethical robots (and autonomous systems)

How do we build autonomous systems that behave ethically (as far as it is possible for them to do so)? Should we go for programs that derive their own rules by learning from experience (but whose rules it may not be possible for us be sure of)? Or should we instead use only programs with explicitly formulated rules (but which may not be able to adapt to changing environments)?

Prerequisites: No prerequisites are required, though students should be prepared to put in intellectual effort.

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Tagged With: Humanities and the Arts Economics, Business and Law Engineering and Technology History, Politics and Social Sciences Medical and Health Studies

An Introduction to Electricity and Magnetism

From Newton to Nanotechnology: History and Applications of Physics

From the Solar System to the Universe: An Introduction to Astrophysics and Cosmology

Introduction to Nanotechnology

The Quantum Revolution in Technology

Introduction to the Politics of Global Poverty and Inequality

The United States Health Care System: Best in the World, or Just Most Expensive?

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